See the World, Vote for Change: Survey Shows Travelers More Likely to Be Voters

June 24, 2019

If we want to show each other just how powerful we can be, and maybe even encourage voting for positive impact, perhaps we should first plan a group trip.

People who travel the world are more likely to vote for positive change.

That’s a key finding from COIN’s State of the Conscious Consumer Study, which surveyed 1,003 people ages 18 and older on their opinions and behaviors toward positive social and environmental change. 

In fact, when we looked at the survey data, we saw that people who identified as travelers are more likely than the average American to vote for positive change on a variety of issues.  

Take a look:

Travelers, it seems, understand their power as individuals to make a positive impact, especially when it comes to voting for causes like public health, sustainable development, and equal access to prosperity. 

Why are travelers more likely to vote for positive change? Well, travelers by nature are curious. They want to see more of the world, and to learn about other cultures by experiencing them first-hand. That same curiosity could apply back home: Americans who travel may want to learn as much as they can about the issues impacting their own communities, states, and country – and they’ll vote to make things better. 

For example, a traveler who sees how other cities are reducing waste may be inspired to vote for green initiatives on the ballot. 

A traveler who visits a country with strong female leaders may then be inspired to vote for female candidates. 

A traveler who gets sick unexpectedly while on the road, and gets treated at a public hospital, may then vote for universal health care policies back home.

Travel, at heart, is discovery. It’s embracing the unfamiliar, experiencing new cultures and ways of life. Travelers are OK with taking chances and navigating the unknown. Things as simple as figuring out a route map, or successfully ordering a meal at a restaurant where no one speaks the same language as you, can show the power of small actions that make a big impact. 

Voting, at heart, is hopeful. It’s using our voices to improve our world. Voting indicates we’re curious about how we can make things better. It shows a desire for progress and change. 

And hope is something we all could use: Our survey also found that just 23% of Americans feel they have the power to make a difference. So, if we want to show each other just how powerful we can be, and maybe even encourage voting for positive impact, perhaps we should first plan a group trip. 

Which travels will inspire you to take action this year?

*The 2019 State of the Conscious Consumer Study was commissioned by COIN by John Hancock and fielded by independent research firm Equation Research in May 2019. The responses were generated from a survey of 1,003 people ages 18+.